A cardboard cathedral

St elmo Courts Office is a 5 storey office base isolated building which uses timber support beams.  The hybrid building is constructed from a mix of concrete, steel and wood.
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Merritt’s Office has a totally different feel to any other building.

It is a commercial space containing an upmarket furniture store on the ground floor and designer offices upstairs.

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The 3 storey timber framed office building (1,600 m2) utilises post-stressed LVL box beam and frames with timber concrete composite floors.

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The two storey Trimble building is the first building in New Zealand to use both post-tensioned LVL frames and post-tensioned LVL walls with energy dissipating devices for the load resisting system.

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The site is split into two blocks – the first block frame took 1 week which apparently was too long for the clients.  The second block frame took 6 hrs!
It is very quick and quiet to install services into the timber.
There was a very good attitude on site considered largely to be because of the timber.

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The Cardboard cathedral in Christchurch is a temporary structure built to replace the earthquake damaged cathedral.  The original proposal was for a structure built entirely from cardboard tubes.  However, this was met with some concern and so they have since been supported with LVL and steel.

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The Tait Communication building is a 2 storey timber framed office building (3,500 m2). The structure consists of a LVL Timber and Steel framed Structure, sitting on a screw piled foundation system. The client wanted to build something a bit different in line with their culture and brand. Part of the vision was that it needed to be timber construction.

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Services deliberately left exposed to show the timber structure.

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Construction was really quick – a huge bonus for timber.

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One Response to A cardboard cathedral

  1. Nick Hewson says:

    Great blogging Chris! It was a hugely inspiring trip and I’ve come back even more determined to spread the word on timber construction.

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